Thursday, December 22, 2011

Ancestral Lines - New Numbering System

{NSGS Newsletter Editor: Below are excerpts from an article that was recently posted on Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter. Links and citations are provided to allow access to the complete article.}

The following information is from Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter and is copyright by Richard W. Eastman. It is re-published here with the permission of the author. Information about the newsletter is available at < http://www.eogn.com >. (Published 17 December 2011)

Ancestral Lines Pairing System:
A New Genealogy Numbering System


Genealogists have invented several different numbering systems over the years to keep track of the individuals in a genealogy. In situations where names are repeated often in a family, a numbering system helps identify the individual of interest. We already have Ahnentafel Numbers, d'Aboville Numbers, Henry Numbers, the Register System, the Dollarhide System, and the NGSQ System. Each assigns numbers, letters, or combinations of numbers and letters to each individual. Now, writing in the American Ancestors web site, Capers W. McDonald has suggested using a new numbering system: the Ancestral Lines Pairing System.

You can read an abbreviated version of the article at http://www.americanancestors.org/ancestral-lines/ or http://goo.gl/WGUWe

Irish Certificate of Heritage

{NSGS News Editor: Below are excerpts from an article that was recently posted on GeneaNet Newsletter < http://genealogyblog.geneanet.org/ > By Jean-Yves BAXTER. Published 9 December 2011. Links and citations are provided to allow access to the complete article.}

Certificate of Irish Heritage is now available
for Americans of Irish ancestry


Irish government seeks to honor the Irish roots of close to 40 million Americans
By JANE WALSH, IrishCentral Staff Writer

Published Friday, December 9, 2011, 7:27 AM
Updated Friday, December 9, 2011, 10:24 AM

http://www.irishcentral.com/news/Certificate-of-Irish-Heritage-is-now-available-for--Americans-of-Irish-ancestry-135312133.html

The Certificate of Irish Heritage is now available in the United States and around the world.
The certificate honors those ancestors who sacrificed so much by leaving Ireland and who created opportunities for later generations.
Up to 40 million Americans, 35 million with Irish ancestry and five million with Northern Irish roots are eligible to apply.
Irish Americans can also now honor and celebrate their ancestors with their own Certificate of Irish Heritage.

The Certificate is a Government of Ireland programme providing official recognition to people of Irish ancestry across the world.
Read more: http://www.irishcentral.com/news/Certificate-of-Irish-Heritage-is-now-available-for--Americans-of-Irish-ancestry-135312133.html#ixzz1gkBhQ7s4

1940 U.S. Census - Indexing

{NSGS Newsletter Editor: Below are excerpts from an article that was recently posted on Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter. Links and citations are provided to allow access to the complete article.}

The following information is from Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter and is copyright by Richard W. Eastman. It is re-published here with the permission of the author. Information about the newsletter is available at < http://www.eogn.com >. (Published 16 December 2011)

Three Genealogy Powerhouses Join Forces
to Publish the 1940 US Census Index


The following announcement was written by Archives.com, FamilySearch International, and findmypast.com:
16 December 2011

SALT LAKE CITY—Three leading genealogy organizations, Archives.com, FamilySearch International, and findmypast.com, announced today they are joining forces to launch the 1940 US Census Community Project. The ambitious project aims to engage online volunteers to quickly publish a searchable, high quality name index to the 1940 US Census after it is released in April 2012 by the National Archives and Record Administration of the United States (NARA). The highly anticipated 1940 US Census is expected to be the most popular US record collection released to date. Its completion will allow anyone to search the record collection by name for free online. Learn more about this exciting initiative or how to volunteer at www.the1940census.com.

The 1940 US Census Community Project is also receiving additional support from leading societal organizations like the Federation of Genealogical Societies, National Genealogical Society, and Ohio Genealogical Society.

The population of the US in 1940 was approximately 130 million. NARA’s census images will not have a searchable index. The goal of the 1940 US Census Community Project is to create a high quality index online linked to the complete set of census images as soon as possible. The index will allow the public to easily search every person found in the census and view digital images of the original census pages. The collection will be available online for free to the general public at Archives.com, FamilySearch.org, and findmypast.com, the sponsors of the community project. This new collection will open access to family history research like never before for this period in the US.

Friday, December 16, 2011

Old Massachusetts Documents and Photographs Discovered

{NSGS Newsletter Editor: Below are excerpts from an article that was recently posted on Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter. Links and citations are provided to allow access to the complete article.}

The following information is from Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter and is copyright by Richard W. Eastman. It is re-published here with the permission of the author. Information about the newsletter is available at < http://www.eogn.com >. (Published 11 December 2011)

Florida Storage Unit Holds Family Secrets of Massachusetts Families

An abandoned storage unit in Florida has opened a window on the lives of families in Athol, Templeton, Petersham and other northern Central Massachusetts communities. The storage unit had many items, including documents and what appears to be 100- to 150-year-old photographs, of Massachusetts families. Are these from your family? If so, Debbie Meyers wants to talk with you.

You can read more in an article by George Barnes of the Worcester Telegram & Gazette at http://goo.gl/vn2FA.

Dowsing Rods and Genealogy

(NSGS News Editor: Below are excerpts from an article that was recently posted on Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter. Links are provided to allow access to the complete article.)

The following information is from Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter and is copyright by Richard W. Eastman. It is re-published here with the permission of the author. Information about the newsletter is available at http://www.eogn.com. (Published 11 December 2011)

Historians use Dowsing Rods in Hunt for
Rutherford, Tennessee Cemeteries


John Lodl often heard Rutherford County’s old-timers talk of the divining rods, swearing by their eerie movements as proof positive of bodies buried below. No headstone, no matter, they said. In the hands of the right person, the wavering of the rods could say more about a cemetery than the aged records that Lodl oversees in the local archives.


One day last winter, Lodl went from skeptical to startled. In a secluded cemetery in Eagleville, he watched a woman balance a pair of plain old coat hangers on her fingers and walk the field. “Sure enough, when you cross over a grave, those things cross,” Lodl said. “I can’t explain it. But it works.”

Richard Eastman: “I have had my doubts also and have written about dowsing for graves before at http://goo.gl/GExWC. You can read more about John Lodl's eyewitness experiences in The Tennessean at http://goo.gl/xvuCC.”

Saturday, December 10, 2011

Medieval Ireland

{NSGS News Editor: Below are excerpts from an article that was recently posted on GeneaNet Newsletter < http://genealogyblog.geneanet.org/ > By Jean-Yves BAXTER. (Published 09 Decmeber 2011). Links and citations are provided to allow access to the complete article.}

Oldest surviving timber-framed house discovered in Ireland

By http://www.medievalists.net/author/admin/

– December 7, 2011 Archaeologists in County Clare believe they have discovered Ireland’s earliest surviving example of a timber framed house. Dendrochronological analysis is expected to conclude that the timber structure at Chapel Lane, Parnell Street, Ennis, dates back to the late 16th century.

Ms. Irene Clune’s house, known as McParland’s is long understood to have been the oldest inhabited house in the Clare County capital. The building’s triple diamond stone Jacobean chimney has been an icon of medieval Ennis for centuries.

The house was first inspected in 2008 by Clare County Council’s Conservation Officer, who recommended that the property undergo structural repair work. Following detailed technical analyses by the National Monuments Service, officials from Ennis Town Council and Consulting Conservation Engineers, it was concluded that the structure was unstable and represented a danger to the general public.

Very Early English Settlement

{NSGS News Editor: Below are excerpts from an article that was recently posted on GeneaNet Newsletter < http://genealogyblog.geneanet.org/ > By Jean-Yves BAXTER. Accessed 06 December 2011. Links and citations are provided to allow access to the complete article. Some of the material is from the Wikipedia article "Popham Colony.” http://en.geneawiki.com/index.php/Popham_Colony}

Popham Colony {Editor: An interesting bit of North American History}

The Popham Colony (also known as the Sagadahoc Colony) was a short-lived English colonial settlement in North America that was founded in 1607 and located in the present-day town of Phippsburg, Maine near the mouth of the Kennebec River by the proprietary Virginia Company of Plymouth. It was founded a few months after, and in the same year as, its more successful rival, the colony at Jamestown, which was established on June 14, 1607 by the Virginia Company of London in present-day James City County, Virginia.

The exact site of the Popham Colony was lost until its rediscovery in 1994. Much of this historical location is now part of Maine's Popham Beach State Park.

Friday, December 9, 2011

Digitized Small Town Newspapers

{NSGS Newsletter Editor: Below are excerpts from an article that was recently posted on Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter. Links and citations are provided to allow access to the complete article.}

The following information is from Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter and is copyright by Richard W. Eastman. It is re-published here with the permission of the author. Information about the newsletter is available at < http://www.eogn.com >. (Published 28 November 2011)


SavingOurs.com: Dedicated to Digitizing Small Town Newspapers

The following announcement was written by SavingOurs.com:

Morrow, Ohio, 23 November 2011- Saving Ours is a new grassroots group dedicated to preserving our archived records by ensuring they are digitized and made free to the public. The group started earlier this month and has recently published their new website. The website is SavingOurs.com. The group's main focus will be the hundreds of small town newspapers housed in local libraries. Small town newspapers contain invaluable genealogical and history data that will be lost unless preserved and indexed. Currently only a small percentage of these papers have been digitized and of these most are only available after purchasing a subscription. Saving Ours intends to work with local volunteers, companies and governments to digitize these documents and ensure that they are available free to the public

Saving Ours is a grassroots group dedicated to preserving our archived records by ensuring they are digitized and made free to the public.

You can learn more at http://www.SavingOurs.com

Mocavo Introduces U.K. Search Engine

{NSGS Newsletter Editor: Below are excerpts from an article that was recently posted on Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter. Links and citations are provided to allow access to the complete article.}

The following information is from Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter and is copyright by Richard W. Eastman. It is re-published here with the permission of the author. Information about the newsletter is available at < http://www.eogn.com >. (Published 28 November 2011)

Mocavo Introduces a U.K. Version of Its Genealogy Search Engine

I have written before about Mocavo (see http://goo.gl/qJCLo for a list of my earlier articles about Mocavo). I am enthused about this search engine. Mocavo's searches are limited only to genealogy sites. In addition, it has some specialized software that is better at picking out surnames than the other search engines. If you haven't yet tried Mocavo.com to find ancestors, I'd suggest you do so soon.

Now Mocavo has duplicated the technology to make a U.K.-specific genealogy search engine. http://www.mocavo.co.uk/ went live earlier today and the brief chance I had to play with it shows that it works well at finding references to English, Irish, Scottish and Welsh ancestors on the Internet.

Sunday, December 4, 2011

Cousins and British Newspapers

(NSGS News Editor: Below are excerpts from two articles that were recently posted on Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter. Both articles contain information that may be of interest to NSGS Members. Links are provided to allow access to the complete articles.)

The following information is from Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter and is copyright by Richard W. Eastman. It is re-published here with the permission of the author. Information about the newsletter is available at: http://www.eogn.com. (Published 01 December 2011) (Accessed 02 December 2011)

http://blog.eogn.com/eastmans_online_genealogy/2011/12/what-is-second-cousin-once-removed.html

What Is "Second Cousin Once Removed?"

A term often found in genealogy is "removed," specifically when referring to family relationships. Indeed, almost everyone has heard of a "second cousin once removed," but many people cannot explain that relationship. Of course, a person might be more than once removed, as in third cousin, four times removed.

In short, the definition of cousins is two people who share a common ancestor. Here are a few definitions of cousin relationships:
First Cousin: Your first cousins are the people in your family who have at least one of the same grandparents as you. In other words, they are the children of your aunts and uncles.
Second Cousin: Your second cousins are the people in your family who share the same great-grandparent with you.
Third, Fourth, and Fifth Cousins: Your third cousins share at least one great-great-grandparent, fourth cousins share a great-great-great-grandparent, and so on.
Removed: When the word "removed" is used to describe a relationship, it indicates that the two people are from different generations. "Once removed" indicates a difference of one generation, "twice removed" indicates a difference of two generations, and so forth.

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British Newspaper Archive is Now Online

I have written before about plans by the British Newspaper Archive to digitize 40 million news pages from its vast 750 million page collection of old newspapers. You can read one of my earlier articles about the plans at http://goo.gl/LpQYW

Now the collection is online at: http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/

To be sure, not all 750 million pages are online just yet. However, thousands of pages are being added daily. If you do not find what you want today, you might return in a few months to search again. The British Newspaper Archive is a partnership between the British Library and brightsolid online publishing to digitise up to 40 million newspaper pages from the British Library's vast collection over the next 10 years.

Tuesday, November 22, 2011

News from MyHeritage and FindMyPast.ie

(NSGS News Editor: Below are excerpts from two articles that were recently posted on Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter. Both articles contain information that may be of interest to NSGS Members. Links are provided to allow access to the complete articles.)

The following information is from Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter and is copyright by Richard W. Eastman. It is re-published here with the permission of the author. Information about the newsletter is available at http://www.eogn.com. (Accessed 22 November 2011)



The following announcement was written by MyHeritage:

MyHeritage Acquires FamilyLink.com and WorldVitalRecords.com

Significant move into US and addition of historical content mark major evolution for world's most popular online family network

PROVO, Utah & LONDON, UK & TEL AVIV, Israel-- MyHeritage, the most popular family network on the web, announced today the acquisition of FamilyLink.com, Inc., maker of the family history content sites FamilyLink.com and WorldVitalRecords.com. This is MyHeritage's seventh and largest acquisition since 2007. The purchase marks a significant move into the US market commercially and operationally, and will boost MyHeritage’s offering to families with the addition of a vast database of more than 3 billion historical records. With offices and staff in Europe, Australia and Israel, MyHeritage will now be adding its first US-based office in Utah, the home of FamilyLink.com and often cited as the family history capital of the world.
In the short-term, MyHeritage will continue to operate the two sites http://familylink.com/ and http://worldvitalrecords.com/, with the intention of achieving full integration within MyHeritage in 2012. With immediate effect and for an introductory period, loyal subscribers and users of MyHeritage will be entitled to discounts of up to 50% on FamilyLink.com and WorldVitalRecords.com subscriptions, and vice versa.


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findmypast.ie Announces Free Online Family Tree Builder Software

The following announcement was written by http://www.findmypast.ie/:

Launch of Family Tree Builder on findmypast.Ie
• First Irish family history website to offer web-based family tree software
• Allows user to fully benefit from access to almost 10 million records
Today, findmypast.ie becomes the first Irish family history website to offer its users family tree builder software, greatly enhancing its offering to Irish family history enthusiasts.

One of the most important elements in researching your family history is the ability to form a visual representation of your years of hard work and research. Findmypast.ie’s free online application allows users to easily create a tree from scratch and add some of 10 million records now available on findmypast.ie to their existing research.

Monday, November 21, 2011

1940 U.S. Census and Illinois Birth Records

{NSGS News Editor: Below are excerpts from two articles that were recently posted on Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter. Both articles contain information that may be of interest to NSGS Members. Links are provided to allow access to the complete articles.}

The following information is from Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter and is copyright by Richard W. Eastman. It is re-published here with the permission of the author. Information about the newsletter is available at http://www.eogn.com. (Accessed 17 November 2011)

1940 U.S. Census Hosting Awarded to Archives.com

The U.S. National Archives and Records Administration long ago announced that the 1940 census records would be hosted online as digital images free of charge, beginning on April 2, 2012. However, until now, NARA did not mention WHERE the images would be found. Since the National Archives and Records Administration does not have enough web servers or personnel to do the hosting on the www.nara.org web site, the assumption has always been that NARA would contract with a commercial firm to provide the hosting.

You can learn more about the data contained within the 1940 census at http://www.rigensoc.org/1940CensusCountdown.pdf

You can learn more about FamilySearch's plans for indexing at https://familysearch.org/1940Census
About Archives.com

Archives.com is the website that makes family history simple and affordable. Archives.com is owned and operated by Inflection a data commerce company headquartered in the heart of Silicon Valley. It has proven its leadership in the family history industry through its commitment to building powerful, easy to use tools, and helping researchers discover new family connections with its growing database of over 1.5 billion records. Archives.com parent company Inflection was chosen by the National Archives to host the 1940 Census. Learn more about the project at http://www.archives.com/1940census.

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New Laws Allow Adopted People 21+ to Obtain
Their Original Birth Certificates in Illinois

For nearly 250,000 people adopted in Illinois, anyone over the age of 21 can get a copy of their original birth certificate. Even if it was a closed adoption, the birth parents names will be included on birth certificates.

You can read more in an article by Tina Stein at http://goo.gl/auLKy

Friday, November 11, 2011

Records Published Online - New Releases

{NSGS Newsletter Editor: Below are excerpts from two articles that were recently posted on Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter. Links and citations are provided to allow access to the complete articles.}

The following information is from Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter and is copyright by Richard W. Eastman. It is re-published here with the permission of the author. Information about the newsletter is available at < http://www.eogn.com >. (Accessed 11 November 2011)

Ancestry.co.uk Offers Free Access to World War I Records

To commemorate Remembrance Weekend, Ancestry.co.uk is giving everyone the chance to discover their family’s role in the Great War. Access to World War I Service Records, Pension Records and Medal Index Cards is completely FREE, until November 13th.

You can read more in an article by Annabel Reeves in the Ancestry.co.uk blog at < http://blogs.ancestry.com/uk/2011/11/10/free-world-war-i-records/ >.


10 million Cheshire Records Go Online at findmypast.co.uk

The following announcement was written by findmypast.co.uk:

CHESHIRE REVEALED AS A WONDERLAND OF UNUSUAL FINDS AS NEW LOCAL RECORDS GO ONLINE

Fascinating workhouse records, parish registers, bishop’s transcripts and electoral registers from Cheshire go online for the first time ever as leading UK family history website findmypast.co.uk launches the The Cheshire Collection. The collection is a series of over 10 million extraordinary records provided by Cheshire Archives and Local Studies, covering over 350 years of history.

To find out more and search the records, visit < http://www.findmypast.co.uk/home.jsp >.

Spanish Cemetery Evictions

{NSGS Newsletter Editor: Below are excerpts from an article that was recently posted on Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter. The practice of leasing space in cemeteries is fairly common in many countries. Links and citations are provided to allow access to the complete article.}

The following information is from Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter and is copyright by Richard W. Eastman. It is re-published here with the permission of the author. Information about the newsletter is available at < http://www.eogn.com >. (Accessed 09 November 2011)

Torrero, Spain, Evicts Thousands of Ancestors' Remains

A crowded Spanish cemetery has begun placing stickers on thousands of burial sites with lapsed leases as a warning to relatives that their ancestors face possible eviction. The deputy urban planning manager for Zaragoza in Spain's northeast, said Monday that the city's Torrero graveyard has already removed remains from some 420 crypts, and reburied them in common ground.

The cases involve graves whose leases had not been renewed for 15 years or more. Torrero, like many Spanish cemeteries, no longer allows people to buy grave sites, instead leasing them out for periods of five or 49 years.

7,000 of the graveyard's 114,000 burial sites have leases that have run out.

You can read more in an article in the EITB.com web site at < http://goo.gl/OKjhC >.

Quebec's Early Settlers

{NSGS News Editor: Below are excerpts from an article that was recently posted on the GeneaNet Newsletter < http://genealogyblog.geneanet.org/ > By Jean-Yves BAXTER. Accessed 08 November 2011. Links and citations are provided to allow access to the complete article.}

Quebec’s Earliest Settlers Left Strongest Genetic Imprint on Province

Postmedia News Nov 3, 2011 By Marianne White

QUEBEC — The first settlers to colonize the wilderness of northeastern Quebec had more offspring and were more successful in passing on their genes than those who followed, according to a genealogical research published Thursday in the journal Science.
The study, conducted by Canadian and Swiss researchers, looked at the genealogy of more than 1.2 million Canadians in the recently colonized Quebec regions of Charlevoix and Saguenay-Lac St. Jean.

Access to the complete article: < http://news.nationalpost.com/2011/11/03/quebecs-earliest-settlers-left-strongest-genetic-imprint-on-province-study/ >.

Friday, November 4, 2011

Restrictions of Access to Records

(NSGS News Editor: Below are excerpts from two articles that were recently posted on Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter. Both articles contain information that may be of interest to NSGS Members. The Social Security Administration is changing the Social Security Death Index and the State of Virginia may further restrict access to vital records. Members of the genealogy community should voice their opinions concerning these important changes. Links are provided to allow access to the complete articles.)

The following information is from Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter and is copyright by Richard W. Eastman. It is re-published here with the permission of the author. Information about the newsletter is available at http://www.eogn.com. (Accessed 02 November 2011)

Important Changes Made to the Public Death Master File (DMF) and the Social Security Death Index (SSDI)

Effective yesterday, 01 November 2011, the Social Security Administration (SSA) changed its policy on what records it will use as source material for adding new entries in the Public Death Master File (DMF) which, in turn, is used to create the Social Security Death Index (SSDI).

The Agency decided that it can no longer use state death records to add new entries to the DMF. Furthermore, the SSA will remove approximately 4.2 million records currently on the SSDI because those entries were…

Link to complete article: < http://ssa-custhelp.ssa.gov/ci/fattach/get/601/ >.



FGS Asks Your Assistance to Fight Virginia Records Access Restrictions
The following announcement was written by the Federation of Genealogical Societies:
November 2, 2011 – Austin, TX. The Federation of Genealogical Societies (FGS), in conjunction with the Records Preservation and Access Committee (RPAC), calls upon its members as well as the genealogy community to help fight increased restrictions to Virginia vital records – records that are important to the genealogy research process.

Link to complete article:
http://www.geneabloggers.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/11/20111101-Memo-re-VA-Vital-Records.pdf


Thursday, October 27, 2011

FamilySearch and U.K. Archive Additions

{ NSGS News Editor: Below are excerpts from press releases that were recently posted on Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter. There is information concerning FamilySearch and the U.K. National Archives. Links are provided to allow access to the complete articles. }

“The following information is from Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter and is copyright by Richard W. Eastman. It is re-published here with the permission of the author. Information about the newsletter is available at http://www.eogn.com.” {Accessed 27 October 2011}

FamilySearch Records Update 26 October 2011
The following announcement was written by FamilySearch:
“Search New Free U.S. Records from California, Iowa, and Texas
New Collections Added for Guam, Japan, and Wales
New records were added to FamilySearch.org this week from Canada, Chile, the Czech Republic, England, Guam, Hungary, Japan, Norway, the U.S., and Wales. Begin searching for your ancestors now at https://FamilySearch.org.”



U.K. National Archives
“Dorset's Manorial Documents Register Now Available Online
The U.K. National Archives' web site has announced that the Dorset section of the Manorial Documents Register (MDR) has been made available online at http://nationalarchives.gov.uk/mdr/.

The Manorial Documents Register records information on Dorset's manorial records from over 400 manors, held at over 50 different locations, some in publicly accessible institutions and others still in private ownership. The Dorset project benefits researchers worldwide, enabling them to search for manorial records by manor, parish, type of record or by date, and to identify relevant records online for the first time for this county.”

Sunday, October 23, 2011

Historic American Newspapers { a great collection ! }

{ NSGS News Editor: We have mentioned the Chronicling America project in past articles. Since this digitized newspaper project is expanding continually, it should be check frequently for additions. The search engine is strong, and the print feature includes full citations. A good research website ! The following is extracted and abridged from the website. Accessed October 2011. }

“Search America's historic newspapers pages from 1836-1922 or use the U.S. Newspaper Directory to find information about American newspapers published between 1690-present. Chronicling America is sponsored jointly by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Library of Congress.”

Access to the website: < http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/newspapers/ >.

Thursday, October 20, 2011

Online "Historical U.S. County Boundaries"

Free new online Historical U.S. County Boundary maps. Very useful when trying to determine where the ancestors lived. Check out this service at: < http://randymajors.com/p/maps.html >.

Sunday, October 16, 2011

"Old San Francisco Pictures Online"

(NSGS News Editor: Below are excerpts from an article that was recently posted on Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter. The article contains interesting information regarding digitized photo collections. Links are provided to allow access to the complete article.)

The following information is from Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter and is copyright by Richard W. Eastman. It is re-published here with the permission of the author. Information about the newsletter is available at http://www.eogn.com. (Accessed 15 October 2011)


"Old San Francisco Pictures Online

If you or your ancestors ever lived in San Francisco, don't visit this site! It is addictive. You'll spend hours looking at the pictures!

Dan Vanderkam moved to San Francisco in 2007 to work at Google. He became fascinated with his new city’s history and soon found the San Francisco Public Library’s online repository of old pictures. However, he quickly became frustrated by the site's awkward user interface. He thought, 'there must be a better way.' http://www.oldsf.org/ is the result. …”

Friday, October 14, 2011

Preservation of Digital Files

{NSGS News Editor: Below are excerpts from an article that was recently posted on Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter. The article contains information about preservation of digital files. Links are provided to allow access to the complete article.}

The following information is from Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter and is copyright by Richard W. Eastman. It is re-published here with the permission of the author. Information about the newsletter is available at http://www.eogn.com. (Accessed 13 October 2011)

Digital Preservation-Friendly File Formats for Scanned Images

“If you want to keep family photographs or even scanned images of documents and books available for use by future generations, you'll be interested in an article by Bill LeFurgy that has been published in the Library of Congress' web site. Digital Preservation-Friendly File Formats for Scanned Images describes the better file formats to use. The article is essentially an introduction to a longer paper with the title, Sustainability of Digital Formats Planning for the Library of Congress…
You can read the entire article at < http://goo.gl/Ohcxt >.”

{NSGS News Editor: As you consider various forms of long-term digital storage, take a look at "cloud computing."}

Saturday, October 8, 2011

Mocavo: Genealogy Search Engine

(NSGS News Editor: Below is an article that was recently posted on Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter. The article contains information regarding Mocavo that may be of interest to NSGS Members. Mocavo < http://mocavo.com/ > is a genealogy search engine that has been discussed, with interest from Members, at NSGS meetings. Links are provided to allow access to the complete article.)

The following information is from Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter and is copyright by Richard W. Eastman. It is re-published here with the permission of the author. Information about the newsletter is available at http://www.eogn.com. (Accessed 4 October 2011)

Mocavo Raises $1 Million To Build Its Genealogy Search Engine

I have written before about Mocavo, the genealogy search engine. (You can read my previous articles about Mocavo if you start at http://goo.gl/rtuuI.) Mocavo is a unique and valuable service for genealogists. Now the start-up has received a $1 million round of financing.

Founder Cliff Shaw says that Mocavo is setting out to make genealogy “open, social, and automated”. He explains that while there are existing services that use proprietary data sources, few take advantage of the abundance of information that’s freely available on the web — information that Google often passes over, because genealogical information is neither fresh nor popular (he says Google only indexes less than 5% of this content).
You can read more about Mocavo's new financing in an article by Jason Kincaid in the TechCrunch web site at http://goo.gl/gNLUd

Thursday, September 29, 2011

Irish Family History

{NSGS Newsletter Editor: Below are excerpts from a press release that was recently posted on Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter. The article contains information about Irish research via findmypast.ie. Links are provided to allow access to the complete article.}

The following information is from Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter and is copyright by Richard W. Eastman. It is re-published here with the permission of the author. Information about the newsletter is available at http://www.eogn.com. (Accessed 26 September 2011)

September 25, 2011

findmypast.ie Launches Online Irish Family History Forums

The following announcement was written by http://www.findmypast.ie/:
“findmypast.ie has announced the launch of one of the first online forums solely dedicated to those researching their Irish family history. The forum is an online community for the Irish diaspora to discuss everything from researching Irish family history and Irish geography, to success stories and what it means to be Irish. Free to all registered users, it represents the findmypast family's first foray into community based chat.

Recognising the inherent difficulties involved in looking for Irish ancestors, the forum gives amateur and professional family historians alike the opportunity to ask their questions to like-minded researchers across the globe. This will enable members to benefit from the experience gained from those who have previously hit brick walls in their research and overcome them.”

Kinship in England

{Newsletter Editor: The following abridged information was posted on GeneaNet Newsletter by Jean-Yves BAXTER: < lettre@geneanet.org >. Accessed 22 September 2011. Links are provided for access to the entire article: < http://genealogyblog.geneanet.org/index.php/post/2011/09/The-Transformation-of-Kinship-and-the-Family-in-Late-Anglo-Saxon-England.html >.}

The Transformation of Kinship and the Family in Late Anglo-Saxon England

The development of the family into a small unit in which descent was traced almost exclusively through the male line is regarded as a major turning point in medieval European history.

The early stages of the formation of agnatic kinship have usually been connected to strategies designed to preserve and retain control of patrimonies and castles, arising from the breakdown of public order.

1871 Canadian Census

{Newsletter Editor: The following is abridged and reprinted from a press release distributed by Library and Archives Canada: < http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/whats-new/013-537-e.html >, accessed 28 Sept. 2011. Links are provided to provide access to the entire article.}

Library and Archives Canada
What's New
Launch of "Census of Canada, 1871"
Ottawa, August 30, 2011— The 1871 census marked the first regularly scheduled collection of national statistics, and Library and Archives Canada is now pleased to make its results available online. Researchers can access digitized images of original census returns featuring the name, age, country or province of birth, nationality, religion, and occupation of Canada's residents at the time.
The information covers the four provinces that were part of the Dominion of Canada in 1871: New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Ontario and Quebec.
Access to the digitized images of the 1871 census is available online in two different ways:
• Through a database that is searchable by nominal information such as Name, Given Name (s) and Age, and/or geographical information such as Province, District Name, District Number, and Sub-district Number. The database is available at: < www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/databases/census-1871/index-e.html
>.
• Through the "microform digitization” research tool, you can browse the microfilm reels page by page. The tool is available at: < www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/microform-digitization/006003-110.02-e.php?&q2=26&interval=30&sk=0&&PHPSESSID=f0v3thhcgqvau3vslaruumn2a7 >.

For more information, please contact: < webservices@lac-bac.gc.ca. >

Friday, September 23, 2011

Getting the most out of FamilySearch

(NSGS Newsletter Editor: Below are excerpts from an article that appears on the FamilySearch “Learn” page. The article describes how to get the most out of records that you research on FamilySearch. As with most search engines, there are many nuances that improve the quality of your research. A link is provided to allow access to the complete article: < https://www.familysearch.org/node/1350 >.)

“Make Sure You’ve Searched All the Records
September 23, 2011 - 1:09pm by AndersonSF
Most people using FamilySearch don’t get the full benefit of their search. FamilySearch has 2.34 billion indexed names that can be searched using the search fields on the home page. If they don’t find their ancestor using the search fields, they assume they are not in FamilySearch.
However, users need to remember that in addition to the 2.34 billion indexed names in FamilySearch, there an additional 312.4 million names that have not been indexed and cannot be searched using the usual search fields. These collections are referred to as browse only image collections.”

Wednesday, September 21, 2011

"Immigrants to New England" - NEHGS

(NSGS Newsletter Editor: Below are excerpts from a press release that was recently posted on Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter. The article contains information about the New England Historic Genealogical Society. Links are provided to allow access to the complete article.)

The following information is from Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter and is copyright by Richard W. Eastman. It is re-published here with the permission of the author. Information about the newsletter is available at http://www.eogn.com. (Accessed 21 September 2011)


NEHGS releases the Seventh & Final Volume of The Great Migration Series: Immigrants to New England 1634—1635

Boston, MA – September, 20, 2011 – The New England Historic Genealogical Society (NEHGS) announced today the release of the seventh and final volume of The Great Migration Series: Immigrants to New England 1634—1635, which is now available online at http://www.greatmigration.org/.

First proposed to NEHGS in 1988 by Robert Charles Anderson, FASG, the Great Migration Study Project aims to produce comprehensive biographical and genealogical accounts of all immigrants to New England between the years 1620 and about 1643.

To date, The Great Migration series includes a total of 10 volumes; three for the years 1620—1633, and seven volumes for 1634—1635. This latest volume includes all immigrants whose surnames are “T” through “Y.”

Founded in 1845, New England Historic Genealogical Society is the country's leading resource for family history research. Our award-winning website, http://www.americanancestors.org/home.html, provides access to more than 135 million searchable names in 3,000 collections.

Monday, September 12, 2011

Illinois Genealogy Research

(NSGS Newsletter Editor: Below are excerpts from a press release that was recently posted on Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter. The article contains information about the Illinois State Genealogical Society. Links are provided to allow access to the complete article.)

The following information is from Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter and is copyright by Richard W. Eastman. It is re-published here with the permission of the author. Information about the newsletter is available at http://www.eogn.com. (Accessed 9 September 2011)

September 08, 2011
Now Available: The Insider’s Guide to Illinois Genealogy
The following announcement was written by the Illinois State Genealogical Society:
Illinois State Genealogical Society Debuts New Guide for Family Historians with Prairie State Ancestors

September 8, 2011 – Springfield, IL. The Illinois State Genealogical Society (ISGS) proudly announces the debut of the Insider’s Guide To Illinois Genealogy – a handy reference guide for family historians and genealogists. With the Insider’s Guide researchers will find everything they need to get started to find Prairie State ancestors.

The Insider’s Guide will be available in limited quantities during the Federation of Genealogical Societies’ 2011 Conference in Springfield, Illinois. Visit the Illinois State Genealogical Society at Booths 205/207 in the Exhibit Hall at the Prairie Capital Convention Center to purchase your copy or to join ISGS. The guide will be given away FREE to the first 100 members who join ISGS.

With a conference special price of $5 each, the guide is expected to sell quickly. The guide can also be purchased online at http://bit.ly/ISGSguide for $7 which includes shipping and handling.

Sunday, September 4, 2011

Fold3 (formerly Footnote) Adds Documents

(NSGS Newsletter Editor: Below are excerpts from the Fold3 blog that was recently posted on Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter. The article contains information about Fold3 (formerly Footnote). Links are provided to allow access to the complete article.)

The following information is from Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter and is copyright by Richard W. Eastman. It is re-published here with the permission of the author. Information about the newsletter is available at http://www.eogn.com. (Accessed 4 September 2011)



5 New Titles Recently Added to Fold3

September 1, 2011 by Trevor (from the Fold3 blog)
Fold3, formerly known as Footnote.com, has added five new collections to the online service. These include:
• War of 1812 Pension Files (available to everyone free of charge)
• Mexican War Service Records
• Confederate Casualty Reports
• World War I Officer Experience Reports
• WWII "Old Man’s Draft" Registration Cards

More information can be found in the Fold3 blog at http://goo.gl/0FZaq

Thursday, August 25, 2011

Irish Research Links

(NSGS Newsletter Editor: Below are excerpts from an article that was recently posted on Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter. The article contains information regarding Irish research. Within the complete article are fee-based links. Links are provided to allow access to the complete article.)

The following information is from Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter and is copyright by Richard W. Eastman. It is re-published here with the permission of the author. Information about the newsletter is available at http://www.eogn.com. (Accessed 22 August 2011)

August 21, 2011
Searching Your Irish Roots Online
With over 70 million people around the world claiming Irish ancestry, there’s a chance that you have some Irish roots. Why not take look? Your Irish roots are only a click away.

Kate Hickey and Jordana Kozupsky have published a list of online genealogy sites that will help you connect with your Irish roots. You can find this useful list on IrishCentral.com at http://goo.gl/X4QEN


Thursday, August 18, 2011

"1940 U.S. Census to be Free on Ancestry.com"

(NSGS Newsletter Editor: Below are excerpts from a press release that was recently posted on Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter. The article contains information about Ancestry.com and the 1940 U.S. census. Links are provided to allow access to the complete article.)

The following information is from Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter and is copyright by Richard W. Eastman. It is re-published here with the permission of the author. Information about the newsletter is available at http://www.eogn.com. (Accessed 18 August 2011)

August 17, 2011
1940 U.S. Census to be Free on Ancestry.com
Great news in this announcement written by Ancestry.com:
PROVO, UTAH (August 17, 2011) - Ancestry.com, the world’s largest online family history resource, today announced that both the images and indexes to the 1940 U.S. Federal Census will be made free to search, browse, and explore in the United States when this important collection commences streaming onto the website in mid-April 2012.

Ancestry.com is committing to make the 1940 Census free from release through to the end of 2013, and by doing so hopes to help more people get started exploring their family history. As this census will be the most recent to be made publicly available, it represents the best chance for those new to family history to make that all-important first discovery.

Wednesday, August 17, 2011

“Protecting precious photographic memories”

NSGS is a member of the National Genealogical Society, and we receive their quarterly magazine. Published in the current edition is an interesting article by Gordon Lynn Hufford titled “Protecting precious photographic memories.” The NGS magazine is available at NSGS meetings, and Members are encouraged to read the articles.

Lingotek and FamilySearch language translation service

(NSGS Newsletter Editor: Below are excerpts from a press release that was recently posted on Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter. The article contains information about a FamilySearch and Lingotek language translation service. Links are provided to allow access to the complete article.)

The following information is from Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter and is copyright by Richard W. Eastman. It is re-published here with the permission of the author. Information about the newsletter is available at http://www.eogn.com. (Accessed 17 August 2011)


August 16, 2011
Lingotek Enables FamilySearch Members to Translate Historical Family Documents
The following announcement was written by Lingotek:
Users of the World's Largest Genealogy Organization Can Now Translate Records Such as Birth, Death and Marriage Certificates Into Their Native Languages

DRAPER, UT - Lingotek, the leader in collaborative translation solutions, has announced an exclusive, long-term relationship with FamilySearch. With this agreement, Lingotek will help FamilySearch, the largest genealogy organization in the world, translate historical documents so that users can find family members using their native languages. FamilySearch members can now leverage a community of more than 2,000 users to help translate documents through the Lingotek application, which will be embedded directly into the FamilySearch website.

Lingotek's application, available for free to FamilySearch members, will offer instant access to fast, reliable and cost-effective translation of historical documents. Lingotek's crowdsourcing software service, which incorporates natural language and machine translation, is a perfect fit for the large scale community approach of FamilySearch. With Lingotek, users can tap into the FamilySearch volunteer base to translate documents in real-time into their native language.

For more information please visit Lingotek ( http://www.lingotek.com ) on Twitter and Facebook. For logos, executive pictures, screenshots, presentations, demos, and other media, visit Lingotek's media kit.

Saturday, August 13, 2011

Zotero citation manager & Kindle Cloud Reader

(NSGS News Editor: Below are excerpts from two articles that were recently posted on Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter. Both articles contain information that may be of interest to NSGS Members. Links are provided to allow access to the complete articles.)

The following information is from Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter and is copyright by Richard W. Eastman. It is re-published here with the permission of the author. Information about the newsletter is available at http://www.eogn.com. (Accessed 11 August 2011)

“Introducing the Kindle Cloud Reader
You can now read Kindle-formatted books on your computer, using either the Chrome or Safari web browsers. It works on Windows or Macintosh or Linux laptop and desktop computers as well as on the Apple iPad and even on the Google Chromebook laptops. Amazon promises that support for additional browsers will be available soon. 

The Kindle Cloud Reader is available free of charge at https://read.amazon.com/.”

“The New Standalone Zotero
All genealogists need a good citation manager to to keep track of all the papers they have read and accumulated. For years, the most popular citation manger has been Zotero. In fact, I recently recorded a podcast with Connie Reik in which she describe some of Zotero's awesome capabilities. (You can listen to our conversation at http://goo.gl/bgO7l.)


Standalone Zotero Alpha for Windows, Mac and Linux is now available as an alpha release.

All versions of Zotero remain available free of charge.”

Thursday, August 4, 2011

FamilySearch - Updated YouTube Channel

The following article is from Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter and is copyright by Richard W. Eastman. It is re-published here with the permission of the author. Information about the newsletter is available at http://www.eogn.com. (Accessed 04 August 2011)
August 03, 2011

FamilySearch Announces Launch of Updated YouTube Channel

The following announcement was written by FamilySearch:
We're pleased to announce the launch of our updated FamilySearch YouTube channel, Thursday, Aug. 4th. Over the past few months, we have been creating video content to reach a variety of audiences throughout the genealogy world.

In preparation for the launch, we are giving a few influential genealogy enthusiasts a preview of the channel along with an invitation to break the news in your online communities through your blog, Facebook, Twitter, and other social media.

The playlists includes:
• Genealogy in 5 Minutes – a 24-episode series offering an overview of how-to’s, best practices, and helpful hints for doing genealogy.
• Woven Generations – an inspirational series about the benefits and success stories of genealogy work.
• Genealogy Fun – a fun video series highlighting the lighter side of genealogy.
• Societies and Archives – a video series highlighting genealogical societies & archives.
• Genealogy News & Events – What’s going on the genealogy world?
• Family History: Getting Started – a training video series for using FamilySearch.
• “How-to’s” from the Experts – a series of interview clips with best practices for finding your ancestors.
We value your feedback. Please don’t hesitate to let us know ways we can improve the channel and our video content. As we produce these series, if you would like to receive updates or video previews in the future please let us know. Your experience and perspective is extremely valuable to us. You can also join our FamilySearch Facebook page, or follow us on Twitter @FS_News to receive updates and other information.

Sunday, July 10, 2011

New at the Reno Family History Center

New at the Reno Family History Center

Editor: The following abridged information was extracted from instructions published by FamilySearch, March 2011. The complete instructional guide is available at the RFHC. Once an “account” (registration) has been established, a patron may use this service to order film from a home computer. It is suggested that patrons contact the RFHC for details and assistance.

“Online Film Ordering for Patrons”
< https://film.familysearch.org >.

FamilySearch has established an online ordering process for microfilm and microfiche.
Using the online Family History Library catalog to locate research material has long been a very useful process. Now, actually ordering the material can be accomplished from a home computer. Having a FamilySearch account can also be of value for certain types of online records research.

Newspaper Archives - Ever Changing and Improving.

Newspaper Archives - Ever Changing and Improving.

NSGS Member Sandy recently obtained a number of newspaper articles regarding an ancestor who had lived in the Dallas, Texas area from 1873 to 1938. She had seen reference to the articles on the Internet, but they were not readily available. She contacted the Genealogy Section and the Texas/Dallas History & Archives Division of the Dallas Public Library. While they said that they could, for a fee, research the information that she wanted, they offered and alternative that proved to be very valuable.

They suggested that she access the Dallas Morning News’ web site:
< http://dallasnews.com >. The web site is automated, fee-based, and includes newspapers from 1885 to 1977. However, you can search for the articles at no charge ! If you find what you are looking for, you are charged about $10.00 for use of the archives for the entire day. At that point, you can download or print what you want.

This type of automated web site should prove to be popular for genealogy researchers and of little hassle (and probably profitable) to organizations and companies who hold digitized archive material.

Tuesday, June 14, 2011

Digitized Books and Documents - Online

Digitized Books and Documents - Online
Digitized books are becoming an important source of genealogical information.
Surnames you are researching may show up in searchable books when you had
no clue that such information existed. This is frequently the case when
family books show extended ancestral lines.
If your search engine detects a surname that you are looking for in
an obscure publication, go fishing !

New source for digitized material: www.archive.org

This source leads to many old parish registers and federal census records.


Thursday, April 21, 2011

FamilySearch 140 Free Online Genealogy Research Courses

From Dick Eastman's newsletter:

FamilySearch News: 140 Free Online Genealogy Research Courses

The following announcement was written by FamilySearch:
20 April 2011


140 Free Online Genealogy Research Courses
Growing Course Catalog Makes It Easier to Expand Family History Skills


SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH—Ever found yourself researching your family tree and discovering a new branch that extended to another country—and you are not familiar with that country’s records or language? Or perhaps you are a fan of the popular reality show Who Do You Think You Are? and wonder, “How do the producers know what public records to search to find all of those cool stories about that celebrity’s ancestors?” Maybe you’d like to learn more about how to do your family history research but don’t think you can afford to take a class. Thousands of individuals are now satisfying many of those needs through FamilySearch’s growing collection of free online genealogy courses.

In just one year, the number of free FamilySearch courses has grown to over 140—and new courses are added monthly. Most recently, over 25 courses were added for Australia, England, Germany, and the U.S. Additional courses were added that focus on basic tools and techniques for anyone just getting started in family history research, as well as courses for intermediate and advanced researchers. 


“The goal of the initiative is to educate more people worldwide about how to find their ancestors. We do it by filming the experts teaching a particular class of interest and then offering free access to that presentation online—complete with the PowerPoint used and any electronic handouts that the user can download or print for future reference,” said Candace Turpan, FamilySearch instructional designer.


Turpan’s team films presentations made by its staff from the FamilySearchFamily History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah, as well as special guests (the library is frequented by accredited researchers from all over the world). They also travel to industry conferences or other venues where record and research specialists gather. There they film specialists’ presentations and make them available online.


Of course, you don’t have to be into genealogy to find presentations of interest. Fans of The Da Vinci Code or National Treasure might find the Cemetery Art course by Ellen Miller of the Mid-Continent Public Library System in Independence, Missouri, very intriguing and enlightening. Miller’s course teaches about funerary traditions and cemetery iconography. “[Tombstone] practices differ from country to country, culture to culture, and religion to religion. As funeral ceremonies differ, so do the burial practices,” said Miller. Those elements often influence the types of funeral markers and symbols used on headstones, footstones, and tablet stones and can therefore tell important facts about the person they help identify. The key is in understanding the messages behind the symbolism.


FamilySearch uses viewing software that splits the viewing screen (sort of like the picture-in-picture features on some televisions) so the user can watch the video of the presenter while also seeing the PowerPoint presentation. Most courses are 30 minutes in length. You can also fast forward through the presentation or presentation slides or stop and pick up later where you left off—a luxury you don’t get in the live presentation.


“Maybe you enjoy the thrill of deciphering or reading old records in other languages. FamilySearch also has free courses to help genealogy students understand key words and terms of older foreign alphabets and handwriting, including Gothic,” added Turpin. The intent behind all of these courses is to give people the keys they need to successfully find their elusive ancestors in historic records. “Sometimes they just need a new sleuthing skill or resource. These genealogy courses are perfect for those personal development needs,” concluded Turpin.


Whatever your motivation or objective, bookmark and make regular visits to the growing catalog of free courses at FamilySearch.org.


And if you or someone you know currently teaches a class that would be of value to the genealogy community and wants to share it, find out how online at FamilySearch’s genealogy classes online.


Latest Course Additions:


Australia
  • Australia BDM Civil Registration Index
  • New South Wales Early Church Records 1788–1886
  • Using the New South Wales Birth, Death, Marriage Index


England
  • Getting the Most from the National Archives Website
  • Researching in the British Isles
  • What Is Britain?


Germany
  • My Experiences in German Family Research


Research Principles and Tools
  • Cemetery Art
  • Finding Your Way: Locating and Using Maps in Your Research
  • How to Find More at a Genealogy Library
  • If I’d Only Known: Beginner Genealogy Mistakes
  • Managing Your Family Records on the Internet


United States of America
  • Basic U.S. Military Records with Tiff
  • Beginning Census Research and Record Keeping
  • Colonial Immigration
  • Colonial Land
  • County Histories and Your Family
  • Finding the Slave Generation
  • Locating Ancestors on the Final Rolls of the Five Civilized Tribes
  • See You on Sunday! Church Records in Genealogy
  • Some Underused Online Resources
  • U.S. Courthouse Research
  • Welcome to the World of Periodicals


ICAPGen The International Commission for the Accreditation of Professional Genealogists
  • Mentoring Class: Introduction to ICAPGen
  • Mentoring Class: Research Binder
  • Mentoring Class: Evidence Analysis Part II
  • Mentoring Class: Written Exam and Oral Review
FamilySearch International is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer–driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter–day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch has been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources free online at FamilySearch.org or through over 4,600 family history centers in 132 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Saturday, April 9, 2011

Free access to the Civil War Collection on Footnote.com 7-14th

From Dick Eastman's Online Newsletter:


Free Access to the Civil War Collection on Footnote.com


The following announcement was written by Footnote.com, a division of Ancestry.com:
Bombardment at Fort Sumter Launches US Civil War

Footnote-civilwar150-imgWhen Abraham Lincoln took office on March 4, 1861, he feared that civil war was inevitable. Six weeks later, at 4:30AM on April 12, 1861, a mortar shell was fired at Fort Sumter in Charleston Harbor, justifying his fears. On April 14, after a 34-hour bombardment, Fort Sumter surrendered and the War Between the States began.


General_BeauregardThat first shot was fired after Major Robert Anderson, commander of U.S. troops stationed at the fort, refused an evacuation edict from General Beauregard, commander of Confederate troops in Charleston. Beauregard had been one of Anderson's students at West Point. This would be the first of countless times in the years to follow where former comrades met across battle lines, brothers battled brothers, and friends fought against friends.

Nobody was killed in that first attack, yet it would lead to America's bloodiest war. Photography was a new medium, and for the first time, shocking wartime images could be readily viewed by the public. Before the war, Mathew Brady had already gained fame with his photographic portraits of prominent men and women. In fact, Lincoln is credited with saying, "Make no mistake, gentlemen, Brady made me President!" as Brady's photo of him, was printed on his campaign materials.
Major_Robert_AndersonPopular Titles from the Civil War Collection
Civil War Service Records
Confederate Citizens File
Mathew Brady Photos
Civil War "Widows' Pensions" Files
See all titles
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