Thursday, September 29, 2011

Irish Family History

{NSGS Newsletter Editor: Below are excerpts from a press release that was recently posted on Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter. The article contains information about Irish research via findmypast.ie. Links are provided to allow access to the complete article.}

The following information is from Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter and is copyright by Richard W. Eastman. It is re-published here with the permission of the author. Information about the newsletter is available at http://www.eogn.com. (Accessed 26 September 2011)

September 25, 2011

findmypast.ie Launches Online Irish Family History Forums

The following announcement was written by http://www.findmypast.ie/:
“findmypast.ie has announced the launch of one of the first online forums solely dedicated to those researching their Irish family history. The forum is an online community for the Irish diaspora to discuss everything from researching Irish family history and Irish geography, to success stories and what it means to be Irish. Free to all registered users, it represents the findmypast family's first foray into community based chat.

Recognising the inherent difficulties involved in looking for Irish ancestors, the forum gives amateur and professional family historians alike the opportunity to ask their questions to like-minded researchers across the globe. This will enable members to benefit from the experience gained from those who have previously hit brick walls in their research and overcome them.”

Kinship in England

{Newsletter Editor: The following abridged information was posted on GeneaNet Newsletter by Jean-Yves BAXTER: < lettre@geneanet.org >. Accessed 22 September 2011. Links are provided for access to the entire article: < http://genealogyblog.geneanet.org/index.php/post/2011/09/The-Transformation-of-Kinship-and-the-Family-in-Late-Anglo-Saxon-England.html >.}

The Transformation of Kinship and the Family in Late Anglo-Saxon England

The development of the family into a small unit in which descent was traced almost exclusively through the male line is regarded as a major turning point in medieval European history.

The early stages of the formation of agnatic kinship have usually been connected to strategies designed to preserve and retain control of patrimonies and castles, arising from the breakdown of public order.

1871 Canadian Census

{Newsletter Editor: The following is abridged and reprinted from a press release distributed by Library and Archives Canada: < http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/whats-new/013-537-e.html >, accessed 28 Sept. 2011. Links are provided to provide access to the entire article.}

Library and Archives Canada
What's New
Launch of "Census of Canada, 1871"
Ottawa, August 30, 2011— The 1871 census marked the first regularly scheduled collection of national statistics, and Library and Archives Canada is now pleased to make its results available online. Researchers can access digitized images of original census returns featuring the name, age, country or province of birth, nationality, religion, and occupation of Canada's residents at the time.
The information covers the four provinces that were part of the Dominion of Canada in 1871: New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Ontario and Quebec.
Access to the digitized images of the 1871 census is available online in two different ways:
• Through a database that is searchable by nominal information such as Name, Given Name (s) and Age, and/or geographical information such as Province, District Name, District Number, and Sub-district Number. The database is available at: < www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/databases/census-1871/index-e.html
>.
• Through the "microform digitization” research tool, you can browse the microfilm reels page by page. The tool is available at: < www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/microform-digitization/006003-110.02-e.php?&q2=26&interval=30&sk=0&&PHPSESSID=f0v3thhcgqvau3vslaruumn2a7 >.

For more information, please contact: < webservices@lac-bac.gc.ca. >

Friday, September 23, 2011

Getting the most out of FamilySearch

(NSGS Newsletter Editor: Below are excerpts from an article that appears on the FamilySearch “Learn” page. The article describes how to get the most out of records that you research on FamilySearch. As with most search engines, there are many nuances that improve the quality of your research. A link is provided to allow access to the complete article: < https://www.familysearch.org/node/1350 >.)

“Make Sure You’ve Searched All the Records
September 23, 2011 - 1:09pm by AndersonSF
Most people using FamilySearch don’t get the full benefit of their search. FamilySearch has 2.34 billion indexed names that can be searched using the search fields on the home page. If they don’t find their ancestor using the search fields, they assume they are not in FamilySearch.
However, users need to remember that in addition to the 2.34 billion indexed names in FamilySearch, there an additional 312.4 million names that have not been indexed and cannot be searched using the usual search fields. These collections are referred to as browse only image collections.”

Wednesday, September 21, 2011

"Immigrants to New England" - NEHGS

(NSGS Newsletter Editor: Below are excerpts from a press release that was recently posted on Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter. The article contains information about the New England Historic Genealogical Society. Links are provided to allow access to the complete article.)

The following information is from Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter and is copyright by Richard W. Eastman. It is re-published here with the permission of the author. Information about the newsletter is available at http://www.eogn.com. (Accessed 21 September 2011)


NEHGS releases the Seventh & Final Volume of The Great Migration Series: Immigrants to New England 1634—1635

Boston, MA – September, 20, 2011 – The New England Historic Genealogical Society (NEHGS) announced today the release of the seventh and final volume of The Great Migration Series: Immigrants to New England 1634—1635, which is now available online at http://www.greatmigration.org/.

First proposed to NEHGS in 1988 by Robert Charles Anderson, FASG, the Great Migration Study Project aims to produce comprehensive biographical and genealogical accounts of all immigrants to New England between the years 1620 and about 1643.

To date, The Great Migration series includes a total of 10 volumes; three for the years 1620—1633, and seven volumes for 1634—1635. This latest volume includes all immigrants whose surnames are “T” through “Y.”

Founded in 1845, New England Historic Genealogical Society is the country's leading resource for family history research. Our award-winning website, http://www.americanancestors.org/home.html, provides access to more than 135 million searchable names in 3,000 collections.

Monday, September 12, 2011

Illinois Genealogy Research

(NSGS Newsletter Editor: Below are excerpts from a press release that was recently posted on Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter. The article contains information about the Illinois State Genealogical Society. Links are provided to allow access to the complete article.)

The following information is from Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter and is copyright by Richard W. Eastman. It is re-published here with the permission of the author. Information about the newsletter is available at http://www.eogn.com. (Accessed 9 September 2011)

September 08, 2011
Now Available: The Insider’s Guide to Illinois Genealogy
The following announcement was written by the Illinois State Genealogical Society:
Illinois State Genealogical Society Debuts New Guide for Family Historians with Prairie State Ancestors

September 8, 2011 – Springfield, IL. The Illinois State Genealogical Society (ISGS) proudly announces the debut of the Insider’s Guide To Illinois Genealogy – a handy reference guide for family historians and genealogists. With the Insider’s Guide researchers will find everything they need to get started to find Prairie State ancestors.

The Insider’s Guide will be available in limited quantities during the Federation of Genealogical Societies’ 2011 Conference in Springfield, Illinois. Visit the Illinois State Genealogical Society at Booths 205/207 in the Exhibit Hall at the Prairie Capital Convention Center to purchase your copy or to join ISGS. The guide will be given away FREE to the first 100 members who join ISGS.

With a conference special price of $5 each, the guide is expected to sell quickly. The guide can also be purchased online at http://bit.ly/ISGSguide for $7 which includes shipping and handling.

Sunday, September 4, 2011

Fold3 (formerly Footnote) Adds Documents

(NSGS Newsletter Editor: Below are excerpts from the Fold3 blog that was recently posted on Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter. The article contains information about Fold3 (formerly Footnote). Links are provided to allow access to the complete article.)

The following information is from Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter and is copyright by Richard W. Eastman. It is re-published here with the permission of the author. Information about the newsletter is available at http://www.eogn.com. (Accessed 4 September 2011)



5 New Titles Recently Added to Fold3

September 1, 2011 by Trevor (from the Fold3 blog)
Fold3, formerly known as Footnote.com, has added five new collections to the online service. These include:
• War of 1812 Pension Files (available to everyone free of charge)
• Mexican War Service Records
• Confederate Casualty Reports
• World War I Officer Experience Reports
• WWII "Old Man’s Draft" Registration Cards

More information can be found in the Fold3 blog at http://goo.gl/0FZaq