Thursday, December 22, 2011

Ancestral Lines - New Numbering System

{NSGS Newsletter Editor: Below are excerpts from an article that was recently posted on Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter. Links and citations are provided to allow access to the complete article.}

The following information is from Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter and is copyright by Richard W. Eastman. It is re-published here with the permission of the author. Information about the newsletter is available at < http://www.eogn.com >. (Published 17 December 2011)

Ancestral Lines Pairing System:
A New Genealogy Numbering System


Genealogists have invented several different numbering systems over the years to keep track of the individuals in a genealogy. In situations where names are repeated often in a family, a numbering system helps identify the individual of interest. We already have Ahnentafel Numbers, d'Aboville Numbers, Henry Numbers, the Register System, the Dollarhide System, and the NGSQ System. Each assigns numbers, letters, or combinations of numbers and letters to each individual. Now, writing in the American Ancestors web site, Capers W. McDonald has suggested using a new numbering system: the Ancestral Lines Pairing System.

You can read an abbreviated version of the article at http://www.americanancestors.org/ancestral-lines/ or http://goo.gl/WGUWe

Irish Certificate of Heritage

{NSGS News Editor: Below are excerpts from an article that was recently posted on GeneaNet Newsletter < http://genealogyblog.geneanet.org/ > By Jean-Yves BAXTER. Published 9 December 2011. Links and citations are provided to allow access to the complete article.}

Certificate of Irish Heritage is now available
for Americans of Irish ancestry


Irish government seeks to honor the Irish roots of close to 40 million Americans
By JANE WALSH, IrishCentral Staff Writer

Published Friday, December 9, 2011, 7:27 AM
Updated Friday, December 9, 2011, 10:24 AM

http://www.irishcentral.com/news/Certificate-of-Irish-Heritage-is-now-available-for--Americans-of-Irish-ancestry-135312133.html

The Certificate of Irish Heritage is now available in the United States and around the world.
The certificate honors those ancestors who sacrificed so much by leaving Ireland and who created opportunities for later generations.
Up to 40 million Americans, 35 million with Irish ancestry and five million with Northern Irish roots are eligible to apply.
Irish Americans can also now honor and celebrate their ancestors with their own Certificate of Irish Heritage.

The Certificate is a Government of Ireland programme providing official recognition to people of Irish ancestry across the world.
Read more: http://www.irishcentral.com/news/Certificate-of-Irish-Heritage-is-now-available-for--Americans-of-Irish-ancestry-135312133.html#ixzz1gkBhQ7s4

1940 U.S. Census - Indexing

{NSGS Newsletter Editor: Below are excerpts from an article that was recently posted on Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter. Links and citations are provided to allow access to the complete article.}

The following information is from Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter and is copyright by Richard W. Eastman. It is re-published here with the permission of the author. Information about the newsletter is available at < http://www.eogn.com >. (Published 16 December 2011)

Three Genealogy Powerhouses Join Forces
to Publish the 1940 US Census Index


The following announcement was written by Archives.com, FamilySearch International, and findmypast.com:
16 December 2011

SALT LAKE CITY—Three leading genealogy organizations, Archives.com, FamilySearch International, and findmypast.com, announced today they are joining forces to launch the 1940 US Census Community Project. The ambitious project aims to engage online volunteers to quickly publish a searchable, high quality name index to the 1940 US Census after it is released in April 2012 by the National Archives and Record Administration of the United States (NARA). The highly anticipated 1940 US Census is expected to be the most popular US record collection released to date. Its completion will allow anyone to search the record collection by name for free online. Learn more about this exciting initiative or how to volunteer at www.the1940census.com.

The 1940 US Census Community Project is also receiving additional support from leading societal organizations like the Federation of Genealogical Societies, National Genealogical Society, and Ohio Genealogical Society.

The population of the US in 1940 was approximately 130 million. NARA’s census images will not have a searchable index. The goal of the 1940 US Census Community Project is to create a high quality index online linked to the complete set of census images as soon as possible. The index will allow the public to easily search every person found in the census and view digital images of the original census pages. The collection will be available online for free to the general public at Archives.com, FamilySearch.org, and findmypast.com, the sponsors of the community project. This new collection will open access to family history research like never before for this period in the US.

Friday, December 16, 2011

Old Massachusetts Documents and Photographs Discovered

{NSGS Newsletter Editor: Below are excerpts from an article that was recently posted on Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter. Links and citations are provided to allow access to the complete article.}

The following information is from Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter and is copyright by Richard W. Eastman. It is re-published here with the permission of the author. Information about the newsletter is available at < http://www.eogn.com >. (Published 11 December 2011)

Florida Storage Unit Holds Family Secrets of Massachusetts Families

An abandoned storage unit in Florida has opened a window on the lives of families in Athol, Templeton, Petersham and other northern Central Massachusetts communities. The storage unit had many items, including documents and what appears to be 100- to 150-year-old photographs, of Massachusetts families. Are these from your family? If so, Debbie Meyers wants to talk with you.

You can read more in an article by George Barnes of the Worcester Telegram & Gazette at http://goo.gl/vn2FA.

Dowsing Rods and Genealogy

(NSGS News Editor: Below are excerpts from an article that was recently posted on Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter. Links are provided to allow access to the complete article.)

The following information is from Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter and is copyright by Richard W. Eastman. It is re-published here with the permission of the author. Information about the newsletter is available at http://www.eogn.com. (Published 11 December 2011)

Historians use Dowsing Rods in Hunt for
Rutherford, Tennessee Cemeteries


John Lodl often heard Rutherford County’s old-timers talk of the divining rods, swearing by their eerie movements as proof positive of bodies buried below. No headstone, no matter, they said. In the hands of the right person, the wavering of the rods could say more about a cemetery than the aged records that Lodl oversees in the local archives.


One day last winter, Lodl went from skeptical to startled. In a secluded cemetery in Eagleville, he watched a woman balance a pair of plain old coat hangers on her fingers and walk the field. “Sure enough, when you cross over a grave, those things cross,” Lodl said. “I can’t explain it. But it works.”

Richard Eastman: “I have had my doubts also and have written about dowsing for graves before at http://goo.gl/GExWC. You can read more about John Lodl's eyewitness experiences in The Tennessean at http://goo.gl/xvuCC.”

Saturday, December 10, 2011

Medieval Ireland

{NSGS News Editor: Below are excerpts from an article that was recently posted on GeneaNet Newsletter < http://genealogyblog.geneanet.org/ > By Jean-Yves BAXTER. (Published 09 Decmeber 2011). Links and citations are provided to allow access to the complete article.}

Oldest surviving timber-framed house discovered in Ireland

By http://www.medievalists.net/author/admin/

– December 7, 2011 Archaeologists in County Clare believe they have discovered Ireland’s earliest surviving example of a timber framed house. Dendrochronological analysis is expected to conclude that the timber structure at Chapel Lane, Parnell Street, Ennis, dates back to the late 16th century.

Ms. Irene Clune’s house, known as McParland’s is long understood to have been the oldest inhabited house in the Clare County capital. The building’s triple diamond stone Jacobean chimney has been an icon of medieval Ennis for centuries.

The house was first inspected in 2008 by Clare County Council’s Conservation Officer, who recommended that the property undergo structural repair work. Following detailed technical analyses by the National Monuments Service, officials from Ennis Town Council and Consulting Conservation Engineers, it was concluded that the structure was unstable and represented a danger to the general public.

Very Early English Settlement

{NSGS News Editor: Below are excerpts from an article that was recently posted on GeneaNet Newsletter < http://genealogyblog.geneanet.org/ > By Jean-Yves BAXTER. Accessed 06 December 2011. Links and citations are provided to allow access to the complete article. Some of the material is from the Wikipedia article "Popham Colony.” http://en.geneawiki.com/index.php/Popham_Colony}

Popham Colony {Editor: An interesting bit of North American History}

The Popham Colony (also known as the Sagadahoc Colony) was a short-lived English colonial settlement in North America that was founded in 1607 and located in the present-day town of Phippsburg, Maine near the mouth of the Kennebec River by the proprietary Virginia Company of Plymouth. It was founded a few months after, and in the same year as, its more successful rival, the colony at Jamestown, which was established on June 14, 1607 by the Virginia Company of London in present-day James City County, Virginia.

The exact site of the Popham Colony was lost until its rediscovery in 1994. Much of this historical location is now part of Maine's Popham Beach State Park.

Friday, December 9, 2011

Digitized Small Town Newspapers

{NSGS Newsletter Editor: Below are excerpts from an article that was recently posted on Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter. Links and citations are provided to allow access to the complete article.}

The following information is from Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter and is copyright by Richard W. Eastman. It is re-published here with the permission of the author. Information about the newsletter is available at < http://www.eogn.com >. (Published 28 November 2011)


SavingOurs.com: Dedicated to Digitizing Small Town Newspapers

The following announcement was written by SavingOurs.com:

Morrow, Ohio, 23 November 2011- Saving Ours is a new grassroots group dedicated to preserving our archived records by ensuring they are digitized and made free to the public. The group started earlier this month and has recently published their new website. The website is SavingOurs.com. The group's main focus will be the hundreds of small town newspapers housed in local libraries. Small town newspapers contain invaluable genealogical and history data that will be lost unless preserved and indexed. Currently only a small percentage of these papers have been digitized and of these most are only available after purchasing a subscription. Saving Ours intends to work with local volunteers, companies and governments to digitize these documents and ensure that they are available free to the public

Saving Ours is a grassroots group dedicated to preserving our archived records by ensuring they are digitized and made free to the public.

You can learn more at http://www.SavingOurs.com

Mocavo Introduces U.K. Search Engine

{NSGS Newsletter Editor: Below are excerpts from an article that was recently posted on Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter. Links and citations are provided to allow access to the complete article.}

The following information is from Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter and is copyright by Richard W. Eastman. It is re-published here with the permission of the author. Information about the newsletter is available at < http://www.eogn.com >. (Published 28 November 2011)

Mocavo Introduces a U.K. Version of Its Genealogy Search Engine

I have written before about Mocavo (see http://goo.gl/qJCLo for a list of my earlier articles about Mocavo). I am enthused about this search engine. Mocavo's searches are limited only to genealogy sites. In addition, it has some specialized software that is better at picking out surnames than the other search engines. If you haven't yet tried Mocavo.com to find ancestors, I'd suggest you do so soon.

Now Mocavo has duplicated the technology to make a U.K.-specific genealogy search engine. http://www.mocavo.co.uk/ went live earlier today and the brief chance I had to play with it shows that it works well at finding references to English, Irish, Scottish and Welsh ancestors on the Internet.

Sunday, December 4, 2011

Cousins and British Newspapers

(NSGS News Editor: Below are excerpts from two articles that were recently posted on Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter. Both articles contain information that may be of interest to NSGS Members. Links are provided to allow access to the complete articles.)

The following information is from Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter and is copyright by Richard W. Eastman. It is re-published here with the permission of the author. Information about the newsletter is available at: http://www.eogn.com. (Published 01 December 2011) (Accessed 02 December 2011)

http://blog.eogn.com/eastmans_online_genealogy/2011/12/what-is-second-cousin-once-removed.html

What Is "Second Cousin Once Removed?"

A term often found in genealogy is "removed," specifically when referring to family relationships. Indeed, almost everyone has heard of a "second cousin once removed," but many people cannot explain that relationship. Of course, a person might be more than once removed, as in third cousin, four times removed.

In short, the definition of cousins is two people who share a common ancestor. Here are a few definitions of cousin relationships:
First Cousin: Your first cousins are the people in your family who have at least one of the same grandparents as you. In other words, they are the children of your aunts and uncles.
Second Cousin: Your second cousins are the people in your family who share the same great-grandparent with you.
Third, Fourth, and Fifth Cousins: Your third cousins share at least one great-great-grandparent, fourth cousins share a great-great-great-grandparent, and so on.
Removed: When the word "removed" is used to describe a relationship, it indicates that the two people are from different generations. "Once removed" indicates a difference of one generation, "twice removed" indicates a difference of two generations, and so forth.

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British Newspaper Archive is Now Online

I have written before about plans by the British Newspaper Archive to digitize 40 million news pages from its vast 750 million page collection of old newspapers. You can read one of my earlier articles about the plans at http://goo.gl/LpQYW

Now the collection is online at: http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/

To be sure, not all 750 million pages are online just yet. However, thousands of pages are being added daily. If you do not find what you want today, you might return in a few months to search again. The British Newspaper Archive is a partnership between the British Library and brightsolid online publishing to digitise up to 40 million newspaper pages from the British Library's vast collection over the next 10 years.