Sunday, February 26, 2012

The Guild of One-Name Studies

(NSGS Newsletter Editor: The Guild of One-Name Studies has been mentioned by NSGS several times. Especially for those with unusual surnames, it sounds very interesting. Below are excerpts from a press release that was recently posted on Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter. Links are provided to allow access to the complete article.)

The following information is from Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter and is copyright by Richard W. Eastman. It is re-published here with the permission of the author. Information about the newsletter is available at http://www.eogn.com. (Published 24 February 2012)

The Guild’s 6,000th Member

The following announcement was written by the Guild of One-Name Studies:
The Guild of One-Name Studies has reached another milestone. Today the 6,000th member joined the Guild of One-Name Studies.

Details of all the Guild facilities can be found at: http://www.one-name.org/guildsvces.html where you can find out:
• more about undertaking a one-name study
• the benefits of joining the Guild of One-Name Studies, and the assistance members of the Guild can provide to anyone researching their family history on any of the 8,000 plus names currently being researched
Cliff Kemball, the Guild’s Publicity Officer, said today:
“Attaining our 6,000th member is a significant milestone for the Guild of One-Name Studies and is a testament to the continued development of the Guild internationally and the benefits membership provides.

Thursday, February 23, 2012

Digitizing Handwritten Material

{NSGS News Editor: Below are excerpts from an article that was recently posted on GeneaNet Newsletter < http://genealogyblog.geneanet.org/ > By Jean-Yves BAXTER. Published 15 February 2012. Links and citations are provided to allow access to the complete article.}

Digitization Challenge: Handwritten Menus from 1800s

The New York Public Library may evoke 19th century Manhattan, but the Beaux-Arts landmark is at the forefront of one of the biggest challenges of the 21st century: how to digitally store information forever.

“We were the first to take it on, on this scale” says Canadian Barbara Taranto, managing director of the New York Public Library Labs. It’s a tricky undertaking even for this data-systems whiz with her degrees in computer science and digital information science. But by pairing technology with volunteer know-how, the library has scored huge successes.

For complete story:

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/report-on-business/small-business/digital/biz-categories-technology/digitization-challenge-handwritten-menus-from-1800s/article2336734/?utm_medium=Feeds%3A%20RSS%2FAtom&utm_source=Home&utm_content=2336734

1940 U.S. Census - More Information.

(NSGS Newsletter Editor: Below are excerpts from a press release that was recently posted on Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter. Links are provided to allow access to the complete article.)

The following information is from Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter and is copyright by Richard W. Eastman. It is re-published here with the permission of the author. Information about the newsletter is available at http://www.eogn.com. (Published 22 Februry 2012)

Archives.com and National Archives Announce 1940 Census Website

The following announcement was written by Archives.com:

Today Archives.com and the National Archives are revealing the website that will host the 1940 Census beginning April 2, 2012. We encourage you to bookmark the website, and watch the informational video providing behind-the-scenes look at the preparations made to publish the 1940 Census.

Complete story: http://1940census.archives.gov/

Ellis Island - Changes.

{NSGS News Editor: Below are excerpts from an article that was recently posted on GeneaNet Newsletter < http://genealogyblog.geneanet.org/ > By Jean-Yves BAXTER. Published 13 February 2012. Links and citations are provided to allow access to the complete article.}

On Ellis Island, Examining Those Who Arrived Before and After

Officials of Ellis Island estimate that as many as one in three Americans can trace their ancestry to immigrants who landed there from overseas.

Now, the officials are focusing on the other roughly 200 million newcomers who arrived in the United States before Ellis Island opened its doors or after it stopped becoming a portal for immigrants. The national historic site in New York Harbor is halfway through a transformation into a more inclusive National Museum of Immigration.

Source and complete story:
http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/02/12/on-ellis-island-examining-those-who-arrived-before-and-after/

Wednesday, February 15, 2012

15 Minute Genealogy Classes

15 Minute Genealogy

New 15 Minute Genealogy classes
at the Reno Family History Center.

Please refer to the "Member News" page on this
blog for the February and March schedule of classes.

Tuesday, February 14, 2012

Military Records - Restored

{NSGS Newsletter Editor: Below are excerpts from an article that was recently posted on Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter. Links and citations are provided to allow access to the complete article.}

The following information is from Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter and is copyright by Richard W. Eastman. It is re-published here with the permission of the author. Information about the newsletter is available at < http://www.eogn.com >. (Published 13 February 2012)


Restoring Burned Records in St. Louis

If you are looking for military records from World War I and World War II as well as the years between those wars, you probably are already aware that many of the personnel records were destroyed in a fire on July 12, 1973. The National Personnel Records Center lost approximately 16 to 18 million Official Military Personnel Files (OMPF). No duplicate copies of these records were ever maintained, nor were microfilm copies produced. Neither were any indexes created prior to the fire. A complete listing of the records that were lost is not available.

You can read more about the fire and the records that were lost at http://www.archives.gov/st-louis/military-personnel/fire-1973.html.

Ancestors of Celebrities

{NSGS Newsletter Editor: Below are excerpts from an article that was recently posted on Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter. Links and citations are provided to allow access to the complete article.}

The following information is from Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter and is copyright by Richard W. Eastman. It is re-published here with the permission of the author. Information about the newsletter is available at < http://www.eogn.com >. (Published 12 February 2012)

How NBC’s ‘Who Do You Think You Are?’ Picks Its Celebrities

Writing in the Investor's Business Daily web site, Patrick Seitz has produced an interesting article about how the ‘Who Do You Think You Are?’ television show picks the celebrities to be featured. In fact, "a lot of the show’s research into celebrity family trees doesn’t make it on the air. Sometimes researchers either hit a dead end or the stories they uncover don’t make for compelling TV."

“We have an amazing team of researchers who pore through documents and censuses and death records, you name it,” said executive producer Al Edgington. “For every celebrity who is interested we will find everything we possibly can.”

You can read more at http://goo.gl/7Q5wN

Saturday, February 11, 2012

Restrictions on Social Security Death Index ?

{NSGS Newsletter Editor: Below are excerpts from an article that was recently posted on Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter. Links and citations are provided to allow access to the complete article.}

The following information is from Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter and is copyright by Richard W. Eastman. It is re-published here with the permission of the author. Information about the newsletter is available at < http://www.eogn.com >. (Published 08 February 2012)


Ways and Means Committee Social Security Subcommittee Posts Video

I have written several times about the threats to genealogists from mis-guided politicians who seem to believe that restricting access to the Social Security Death Index somehow stop identity theft. As ludicrous as that thought may be, the idea is gaining traction in Washington, D.C. 

One recent article at http://goo.gl/PoK7S mentions "the Subcommittee on Social Security of the House Ways & Means Committee in Washington, D.C., [that] will hold hearings that have the capacity to drastically affect the access of genealogists to the Social Security Death Index (“SSDI”) and related underlying information." The hearings were held by the Ways and Means Committee Social Security Subcommittee finally posted the video to the Feb 2nd hearing at:
 http://waysandmeans.granicus.com/MediaPlayer.php?view_id=2&clip_id=133

My thanks to Jan Meisels Allen for telling me about the video.